Advertising
For centuries, shoemakers and later shoe manufacturers have been placing advertisements to market their products. Initially these were mainly text ads but since the 19th century images have also been used.

For centuries, shoemakers and later shoe manufacturers have been placing advertisements to market their products. Initially these were mainly text ads but since the 19th century images have also been used.

Enamel billboards were long popular for attracting consumers' attention. They praised the goods sold in stores. The Shoe Quarter has a large number of such signs in its collection. Some were manufactured by the Dutch firm Langcat, which has been producing enameled products since 1898.

The first advertisement images we find in newspapers are drawn. Next to a descriptive text, shoe models are depicted, usually in black and white. Magazines also offer colorized mood pages in special editions, just before the start of a new sales season, to whet the reader's appetite for buying. From the 1950s onwards we also see more and more advertisements in which photographs are used. The Waalwijk photographer Piet Pulles photographed new shoe collections of companies from the Langstraat for years. After his retirement he donated a large part of his archive to the Schoenenkwartier. Now he volunteers at the Schoenenkwartier, digitizing the thousands of photos he made at the time.

Very special are the posters that in the years 1950-1970 were meant to entice the customer to buy. Shoe manufacturers commissioned graphic designers and other artists to create artistic images that were printed in very large format and in a large edition. The Swiss company Bally hired the renowned French graphic artist Bernard Villemot (1911-1989), who produced numerous iconic advertising posters for the company. Some of these beautiful posters are in the Shoe Quarter collection.

A very broad collection that focuses on virtually every aspect of leather tanning and shoe making.

The Shoe Quarter, although the name may suggest otherwise, has a very broad collection that focuses on virtually every aspect of leather tanning and shoe making. Research regarding these topics continues unabated. Advertising such as that shown in the photos above is, of course, not to be missed. Enamel signs and posters can be seen in the shoe store, which is part of the permanent exhibition The Story of the Langstraat.